Sandy

If there’s a silver lining for the occurrence of a natural disaster, it’s that they often serve as a reminder that airlines are run by people, not computers.  In response to the fallout of hurricane Sandy, most airlines are allowing affected customers to make one ticket change without the usual change fees.  And for those who had their flight cancelled as a result of the storm – which is reported to be approximately 14,000 – the airlines are refunding them in full.

As a reference for all stranded travelers, here’s an airline-by-airline list of weather waivers.

Here’s some more travel news you can use:

  • Hotels ranging from elite luxury accommodations to budget-priced properties have prepared ahead by stocking light sticks — and in some cases flashlights — specially for the storm.  Even though most hotels have a generator for at least limited lighting, they’re meant to give guests an extra layer of security.  Oh, and they’ll work great on Halloween.
  • The TSA plans to test using a private vendor next year to expand its expedited-security program at airports.  Travelers who aren’t part of an airline frequent-flier program would be able to pay a vendor a fee to undergo a security check based on criteria set by the agency.  The company would notify TSA who gets approved, and applicants who pass a second review by the agency would be admitted to the PreCheck program.
  • Airlines are tapping celebrity chefs such as Suzanne Goin (Singapore Airlines), Michelle Bernstein (Delta Airlines), and Sam Choy (American Airlines) to cook up the kind of meals you don’t expect at 30,000 feet.  American Airlines is going a step further by letting first- and business-class passengers review and reserve their in-flight meal via the airline’s website. You get to choose from among two or three entrees — the same choices you get when you board the plane.
airlines are tapping celebrity chefs such as Suzanne Goin by Singapore Airlines, Michelle Bernstein by Delta Airlines and Sam Choy by American Airlines to cook up the kind of meals you don’t expect at 30,000 feet.
American Airlines is going a step further by letting first- and business-class passengers review and reserve their in-flight meal via the airline’s website. You get to choose from among two or three entrees — the same choices you get when you board t