Continental3

You can officially say goodbye to Continental Airlines.  United Airlines and Continental recently completed the final strokes of their 2010 merger when they combined passenger reservation data from both airlines into a single computer system.  That means one frequent-flier program and one website – and all tickets will be issued under United’s name only.

The Washington Post reports that, “until now, each airline issued its own tickets, and passengers had to use separate ticket counters.  Now, it will no longer matter which ticket counter travelers go to.  Gate agents should be able to book travelers on flights across the combined airline, which will be a big improvement any time a blizzard or thunderstorm snarls travel.”

While you may still see some airplanes painted with the Continental logo, United has already eliminated its use of the Continental brand and has taken down the “Continental” signs at all 372 airports it serves.  United.com will serve as the website for the combined airline – but you’ll notice that its look and feel is the old Continental.com.

Got any Continental memories – good or bad?  Leave them here for posterity sake.

Here’s some more travel news you can use:

  • Speaking of mergers, there are rumors swirling that U.S. Airways and American Airlines could merge.  U.S. Airways, which recently disclosed that it has hired advisers to help it assess a possible combination with American Airlines, has claimed a number of internet addresses that could come in handy if the two carriers got together.  Try these on for size:   American-USAirways.com, AmericanUSAirways.net, USandAA.com, and OneworldOneairline.com.
  • Much to the delight of tech-minded travelers, Hyatt has become the first major hotel brand to roll out an in-room TV system centered around the Internet. The USAToday reports that within about a year, guests in all full-service Hyatt hotels in North America will be able to log onto their Facebook account or stream a movie from their Netflix account and play the content on their room’s 40-or 50-inch TV screen instead of their smaller laptop screen.  You will also be able to use your laptop, iPad or other device to operate the TV.