stretch

There’s an urban legend in travel that people flying in cramped economy class have a greater chance of experiencing blood clots – a potentially deadly condition – than do passengers in first class where there’s more room to stretch out.  That legend was debunked recently by the American College of Chest Physicians as they’ve determined that economy passengers are no more likely to develop a blood clot in a leg on long haul flights than passengers in roomier first-class.  And if you stay hydrated, get up and move around the cabin, or do leg exercises at your seat – you are even less likely to develop blood clots.

Here’s some more travel news you can use:

  • The new Boeing Dreamliner – a composite-bodied aircraft that’s 20 percent more efficient than metal-bodied aircraft – just completed a non-stop 7,679 mile flight between Seattle and Bangkok.  Believe it or not, this flight didn’t even touch the record for the Dreamliner, which last December flew around the world with just one stop for refueling in Dhaka, Bangladesh.  The flight from Seattle to Dhaka eastbound was 12, 325.  Amazing.
  • Virgin Galactic (yes, Galactic) is on course to become the first commercial spaceliner service (yes, spaceliner service) by this summer. Their flights will take passengers to an altitude of 62 miles to the edge of space, then free-fall to Earth to give passengers a few minutes of weightlessness, a view of the darkness of space and the and the curvature of the Earth below before returning to the ground.
  • The Federal Aviation Administration is finally making the leap from radio-based navigation to a modern GPS system. Congress passed a $63 billion bill to fund and extend the FAA’s programs through 2015.  According to the FAA, a satellite-based system would dramatically reduce delays and congestion by streamlining landings and departures.  Under the bill, 35 of the country’s busiest airports have until June 2015 to modernize approaches so pilots can land with GPS.