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The Transportation Security Administration on Tuesday began testing a program at Atlanta, Detroit, Dallas/Fort Worth and Miami airports that will allow expedited screening of some frequent fliers on Delta and American flights.  The program — called “PreCheck” — is method of passenger screening that utilizes intelligence and a risk-assessment of travelers.
The PreCheck program will rely on new machines that match a traveler’s boarding pass with his or her government-issued ID, while verifying that both documents are authentic. The machines will assist the TSA agents that currently check identification by hand using ultraviolet flashlights.
Travelers participating in the program provide the government with personal information that’s used to issue a bar code on their boarding passes. The new technology would authenticate government-issued IDs by comparing written information on the card with information encoded in the ID’s bar codes, magnetic strip or computer chip. It would also match the ID to the boarding pass.
PreCheck passengers will be routed to a security checkpoint lane, where they may be allowed to keep their shoes, belt and jacket on an leave their toiletry and laptop bags in the luggage.  However, the TSA also said that some passengers will continue to be pulled aside for random screeningHere’s some more travel news you can usetransport communications

The Transportation Security Administration on Tuesday began testing a program at Atlanta, Detroit, Dallas/Fort Worth and Miami airports that will allow expedited screening of some frequent fliers on Delta and American flights.  The program – called “PreCheck” – is a method of passenger screening that utilizes intelligence and a risk assessment of travelers.

The PreCheck program will rely on new machines that match a traveler’s boarding pass with his or her government-issued ID, while verifying that both documents are authentic.  The machines will assist the TSA agents that currently check identifications by hand using ultraviolet flashlights.

Travelers participating in the program provide the government with personal information that’s used to issue a boarding pass with a special bar code.  The new technology would authenticate government issued IDs by comparing written information on the card with information encoded in the ID’s bar codes, magnetic strip or computer chip.  It would also match the ID to the boarding pass.

PreCheck passengers will be routed to a security checkpoint lane where they may be allowed to keep their shoes, belt and jacket on and leave their toiletry and laptop bags in the luggage.  However, the TSA also said that some passengers will continue to be pulled aside for random screening.

Here’s some more travel news you can use:

  • A company specializing in air transport communications released the findings of a new survey on Monday that revealed that more and more air passengers expect airlines and airports to communicate with them via mobile devices. The survey also found that passengers are increasing their use of self-service options like self-service gates and bag-tracking apps. Alternatives to airport check-in kiosks are being used more as well. This includes mobile check-in and off-airport check-in at places like hotels, train stations and convention centers.
  • This week, NASA selected the winner of its CAFE Green Flight Challenge, intended to promote more efficient aircraft design, as well as the growth of an electric aircraft industry.  Fourteen teams signed up for the challenge, but only two aircraft met the competition’s efficiency requirements: the aircraft had to travel at least 200 miles at 100 miles per hour, using less than the energy equivalent of one gallon of fuel per occupant.  Pretty amazing stuff.
  • The European Union is on the verge of imposing emission limits on the aviation industry under the Kyoto Protocol, meaning U.S. and other foreign airlines will be asked to pay for their contribution to climate change, and threatening a trade war in the skies.  The effort is currently being challenged by three U.S. airlines, including United, Continental and American, as well as the Air Transport Association.  The European Court of Justice will issue an initial opinion on the case on October 6.  A final decision is expected early next year.