The government plans to announce today a new set of passenger protections to address travelers’ growing frustration over airline fees.
Among the rules, airlines must clearly state baggage fees in advertisements and on their Web sites. Other provisions increase the amount carriers must pay passengers who are involuntarily bumped from flights — from up to $800 to as much as $1,300 for the longest delays.
They also require the airlines to refund checked baggage fees if luggage is lost, and require airlines to promptly notify customers of delays over 30 minutes.
Provisions imposed last June a four-hour limit on time spent on the tarmac for delayed international flights, expanding a policy that has been in place for domestic flights for a year.

billofrights

The government plans to announce today a new set of passenger protections to address travelers’ growing frustration over airline fees.

Among the rules, airlines must clearly state baggage fees in advertisements and on their Web sites. Other provisions increase the amount carriers must pay passengers who are involuntarily bumped from flights — from up to $800 to as much as $1,300 for the longest delays.

They also require the airlines to refund checked baggage fees if luggage is lost, and require airlines to promptly notify customers of delays over 30 minutes.

The provisions also impose a four-hour limit on time spent on the tarmac for delayed international flights, expanding a policy that has been in place for domestic flights for approximately a year.

Here’s some more travel news you can use:

  • Southwest Airlines raised all of its round-trip ticket prices by $10 yesterday – which may spark an industry-wide domestic airfare hike.  If so, this would be the seventh time this year that domestic airlines have raised their fares.
  • Long lines, mobs of people, delays and invasive security measures can make for a stressful experience at the airport.  The New York Daily News recently outlined some simple steps that you can take that make the airport experience a little less hairy.  Give it a read.
  • Atlanta, Denver, Indianapolis, Milwaukee and Detroit are just a few cities pursuing the trend of trying to build an “aerotropolis” – or a small city around their airport.  The vision is for aviation authorities to partner with private companies to cohesively and systematically develop land near their airports to attract office space, warehouses, logistical centers, retail stores, recreational facilities and apartments. Officials see aerotropolises as a way to boost non-avaiation revenue.  Real estate projects promise a steady stream of rent and parking fees that can offset declining income from tight-fisted airline tenants.